C.O.D.E.

Horrific accidents, savage beatings, murder, suicide, autoerotic deaths, overdoses, burned and mutilated bodies: these are nearly every day occurrences for the extraordinary women and men who work in emergency services fields. These selfless individuals are exposed to things the every day person rarely, if ever, sees.

Yet, the men and women who sacrifice family and self are often taken for granted — or treated as if their work doesn’t matter.

An accumulation of these experiences allows the slippery tentacles of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder, a/k/a Compassion Fatigue, to grip the minds, bodies, and souls of those who serve. 911 operators, police, fire, EMS, death investigators, coroners, and others need to know they are not alone.

C.O.D.E. addresses this reality in a real, raw, and relevant way, telling stories inspired by true events and authentic cases. Powerful tips at the end of each chapter offer hope, encouragement, and healing methods — real help for the hurting people who give their all.

Death investigation has evolved greatly in the years since the 1999 release of Death Investigation: A Guide for the Scene Investigator. This revised and updated edi- tion is the result of a collab- orative effort to present the most up-to-date information about the issues confronting death investigators today. The death investigator is the eyes and ears of the forensic pathologist at the scene. It is hoped that these guidelines, reflecting the best practices of the forensic community, will serve as a national standard.

Let me tell you a bit about it and what you can expect from this book. Through out my career I have found that a book on autoerotic death can be full of tedious information, almost like a textbook or lack any real substance. This work is comprised of real information investigators can use to interpret a scene of a suspected autoerotic death. Full of information needed, yet purposefully lacking long explanations of research and controlled studies.