C.O.D.E.

Horrific accidents, savage beatings, murder, suicide, autoerotic deaths, overdoses, burned and mutilated bodies: these are nearly every day occurrences for the extraordinary women and men who work in emergency services fields. These selfless individuals are exposed to things the every day person rarely, if ever, sees.

Yet, the men and women who sacrifice family and self are often taken for granted — or treated as if their work doesn’t matter.

An accumulation of these experiences allows the slippery tentacles of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder, a/k/a Compassion Fatigue, to grip the minds, bodies, and souls of those who serve. 911 operators, police, fire, EMS, death investigators, coroners, and others need to know they are not alone.

C.O.D.E. addresses this reality in a real, raw, and relevant way, telling stories inspired by true events and authentic cases. Powerful tips at the end of each chapter offer hope, encouragement, and healing methods — real help for the hurting people who give their all.

There are some things in life people never get over. No matter how much they want to.
Many experience abuse, financial disaster, serious illness, death of loved ones, and other common traumas making them believe they’ll never move past the pain, but through research and true story compilations, author Anita Agers-Brooks offers emotional, practical, and spiritual insights from experts and people who have survived intense trauma—and have made it through seemingly impossible situations.

This book is specifically designed with police officers, investigators, and coroners in mind. Gathering information from potential witnesses, family, and medical staff is vital in police and coroner investigations. Most law enforcement officers get a small amount of this training in basic academy and then learn as they go from actual case work. This on-the-job approach does refine skills, but if the skills are flawed or underdeveloped to begin with, the flaws just get worse. Another vital area of communication is the suspect interrogation.

Let me tell you a bit about it and what you can expect from this book. Through out my career I have found that a book on autoerotic death can be full of tedious information, almost like a textbook or lack any real substance. This work is comprised of real information investigators can use to interpret a scene of a suspected autoerotic death. Full of information needed, yet purposefully lacking long explanations of research and controlled studies.

This book is designed to be used in conjunction with the Investigating Suicide and Self Harm Death course through the Death Investigation Training Academy. This publication can be used as a stand alone reference, however this is not an all inclusive work on this topic.